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This page shows Fossils 1 to 10 of 40 specimens

Ammonite

Ammonite

Height:20cm     Width:18cm
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Ammonite

This beautifully marked curled fossil shell is an Ammonite. Ammonites have played a surprising role in making the study of fossils a real science. In 1693 Cambridge physics Professor John Woodward, published an essay to prove that fossils were the remains of real creatures. In 1708, Woodward’s follower, Scheuchzer, wrote a pamplet that had a large Pike fish in Lake Constance (Switzerland) proving that fossils are the remains of once living creatures. Scheuchzer’s student, Baier, wrote a book called ‘Nurnberg Petrology’, in which he assembled a large number of Ammonites to show they were not freaks of nature, but the remains of true shells. But why such learned men need to prove such an obvious thing?
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Ammonite Section

Ammonite Section

Height:5cm     Width:7cm
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This fossil is a curled shell of the Ammonite group called a Goniatite. They have played a surprising role in the science of geology. In 1693 English physics professor and member of the Royal Society, John Woodward, published an essay on the evidence for Noah’s flood. One of his aims was to combat the popular ideas of the pagan Greek philosopher, Aristotle, that fossils were made inside the earth by mysterious forces and were not the remains of real creatures at all. In 1708, Woodward’s follower, the Swiss flood geologist, Scheuchzer, wrote a pamplet that has a large Pike fish in Lake Constance (Switzerland) presenting the proof in excellent Latin that fossils are not “mineral offspring of stone and marl” but the remains of once living creatures. Scheuchzer was attempting to give Biblical flood geology credibility in a Christian Europe still largely under the academic influence of ancient pagan thought.


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Ammonite with Tooth Marks

Ammonite with Tooth Marks

Height:25cm     Width:5cm
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Ammonite with Tooth Marks

Ammonite with Tooth Marks
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Arca Shell

Arca Shell

Height:5cm     Width:4cm
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Arca Shell

From Charles Darwin's day (1859) to the present, creatures whose living representatives are similar to their first known fossil appearance in the rock record have been labelled "Living Fossils". The most famous of these is the Coelecanth fish. A lesser known, though more widespread one, is the Ark Shell. It is found through most of the geologic record, and is abundant on many beaches throughout the world. It is usually overlooked because it is so abundant.
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Baryonyx Claw

Baryonyx Claw

Height:15cm     Width:4cm
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BIG CLAW

In January 1983, a London plumber and amateur fossil collector, William Walker, spotted an enormous claw in Smokejacks clay Pit at Wallis Wood, Ockley near Dorking ,Surrey UK. This area had been scoured by geologists for 200 years. (Be encouraged - anyone can find dinosaurs.) Along with the huge claw was found about 70% of a juvenile dinosaur skeleton. It was surprisingly intact, and was given to the London Natural History Museum. It has become known as Baryonyx which means "heavy claw", from the Greek words ‘barus’ meaning 'heavy' and ‘onyx’ meaning 'claw' or 'nail'. In 1986, when the museum published their scientific description of the dinosaur, they named the species after its discoverer William Walker, so it is now known as “Baryonyx walkeri.” Baryonyx is also classified as a theropod dinosaur that walked on two legs.
Theropods were a group of lizard-hipped reptiles, which includes some of the smallest dinosaurs, e.g. Compsognathus - only 70cm or 28 inches long. Therapods had narrow jaws, sharp teeth and long, flexible necks. Like modern antelope, they also had some hollow bones well suited for running fast and jumping. Baryonyx jaw fragments are similar to those of the Spinosaurs, but its spines are much shorter and more stubby. For this reason Baryonyx is classified as belonging to the subfamily Baryonychinae which is a subdivision of the family Spinosauridae.
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Carcharodon Tooth

Carcharodon Tooth

Height:15cm (5.9 inches)     Width:10cm (3.9 inches)
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GIANT FOSSIL SHARK TOOTH

Sharks have a skeleton made of cartilage, (a soft material) so they have few bony hard parts to preserve. This is the reason the most common shark fossils are teeth and occasional spines. The giant fossil teeth of one huge shark were 15 - 20 cm long (6-8 in). The fossil monster was originally named Carcharodon megladon due to its obvious similarity to the present day savage Australian great white shark (also called Carcharadon). Based on the tooth size, it must have grown to at least 15 to 17m (45 -55 ft) in length; had a mouth approximately 2m (6-7 ft) across and weighed up to 60 tons. Fortunately the great white shark no longer grows as big. Giant Shark tooth fossils are found world wide, so how did they get into the rocks and how does this evidence support Creation?
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Carcharodontosaurus Tooth

Carcharodontosaurus Tooth

Height:10cm (4 inches)     Width:4cm (1.5 inches)
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DAGGER MOUTH DINO

This impressive looking, dagger like Carcharodontosaurus tooth is from a big dinosaur.
The first Carcharodontosaurus was discovered in Egypt, by the German, Stromer in the early 1900’s. A more recent find (1970s) was made in Cretaceous rocks at Tenere Oasis (Southern Sahara) by French Paleontologists. Carcharodontosaurus gets its name because the giant fossil white shark - Carcharondon megladon which reached up to 20m long, also had massive sharp teeth. Dinosaurs were not the only giants. What happened to such big monsters? The great white sharks are still here, except they are much smaller now. Dinosaurs seemed to have totally disappeared. So what has happened?
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Dawn Redwood

Dawn Redwood

Height:2cm     Width:15cm

Dawn Redwood

Evolutionists thought the Dawn Redwood tree became extinct many millions of years ago. It was named the Metasequoia, or Dawn Redwood, because it was thought to be the ancestor of the present day Redwood and the Giant Sequoia, of California. Fossil remains of its leaves, twigs and cones are found over much of the northern hemisphere. Metasequoia is known from fossils found in strata as far apart as North Dakota, Alaska and Western Europe. The Metasequoia appears to have become extinct in the USA when the climate cooled and the treeline moved southwards from Alaska to Northern California. The same thing happened in Siberia when the ice came and the tree line moved further south. Metasequoia today only survives in the Szechuan region of China. But in 1944 in a remote bandit-infested mountain valley of Central China, the discovery of a living dawn redwood shocked fossil experts and added another Living Fossil to the increasing list of organisms that provably haven't evolved. The newly discovered tree was 160cm (64 inches) in diameter, 32.5m (98 feet) tall and towered above a small temple in the midst of rice paddies more than 150km (100 miles) northeast of Chungking in Szechwan Province.
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Dino Gizzard Stone

Dino Gizzard Stone

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Dinosaur Coprolite USA

Dinosaur Coprolite USA

Height:4cm     Width:8cm
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Dino Doo

Present day creatures take food in one end, digest it in the middle and pass unused matter out the other end. Such leftovers are called faeces. When preserved and petrified, they are called copralites. Examined under a microscope, they can often tell us what the creature ate and hint at the size and type the animal was (like the difference between sheep and cow droppings). Even the chemistry of a copralite hints at diet, eg. large amounts of calcium phosphate, may have come from eating bones.

Many thousands of Dinosaur copralites have been discovered. Your specimen comes from the Moab region of Utah, USA. Almost no dinosaur droppings (to date of printing) have been proven to have come from carnivorous dinosaurs. The large phosphatic copralites from Belgium and India have also been attributed to fish or crocodiles. Because an animal drops its faeces, there is no direct connection between the animal and its copralite. The connection is made by blaming nearby fossil skeletons for the fossil dung pile. This will always be a guess since both the skeleton and the dung were fossilized by rapidly moving flood water.
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