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Many of these fossils can be seen as high quality pics with a zoom facility.
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This page shows Fossils 31 to 40 of 40 specimens

Opalised Clam

Opalised Clam

Height:3cm     Width:4cm
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Opalised Clam

The beautiful Australian opalized fossil is a closed shell with two halves which are much the same. Such shells are technically known as Lamellibranchs. Most people are familiar with this type of shell, as you see them in seafood shops and eat many of them such as scallops, clams and mussels. They are also commonly seen on beaches, but usually seen only after they die. Then they are found with the two halves spread wide open, just like the wings of a butterfly. As a result they are commonly called butterfly shells - which bring us to an interesting point.
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Petrified Pine

Petrified Pine

Height:1.5 cm     Width:9 cm
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Polished Pine Slab

This section of a fossilized pine log was fairly easy to recognise because much of the cross-section of the trunk is preserved, and pine trees are characterized both by circular rings and by radial canals. Petrified pine is fairly common throughout the fossil record. Such trees make up a significant portion of the vertical polystrate logs we have found in the Australian Permian coalfields. Polystrate means "standing upright through many separate strata", and it is a sure indicator that the many horizontal strata enclosing the vertical tree were formed in less time than it takes a pine tree to rot.
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Pine Cone Fossil

Pine Cone Fossil

Height:7 cm     Width:5cm
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Pine Cone Fossil

This is a fossil pine cone from a conifer (Araucarian variety) preserved in silica. The cone is shown both as a full section, and a section which has been cut through to show the internal seed structure. It was found in Jurassic strata in Argentina which are similar to our Araucaria rich Jurassic Ark site near Gympie, Australia. The petrified Araucaria pine cones of Argentina are usually coloured red and pink with white highlights. As you can see, our specimen still preserves the stem, which held the cone onto the branch. Today's Araucaria cones often drop off with the stem attached. Occasionally, such fossil Araucaria cones are preserved by opal such as those found in the Lightning Ridge deposits of Australia. Some of the best fossil cones come from the USA and are found in a strata called the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison formation. They can be 6-10cm across.
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Pine Cone Fossil Cut

Pine Cone Fossil Cut

Height:7 cm     Width:5 cm
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Pine Cone Fossil Cut

This is a fossil pine cone from a conifer (Araucarian variety) preserved in silica. The cone is shown both as a full section, and a section which has been cut through to show the internal seed structure. It was found in Jurassic strata in Argentina which are similar to our Araucaria rich Jurassic Ark site near Gympie, Australia. The petrified Araucaria pine cones of Argentina are usually coloured red and pink with white highlights. As you can see, our specimen still preserves the stem, which held the cone onto the branch. Today's Araucaria cones often drop off with the stem attached. Occasionally, such fossil Araucaria cones are preserved by opal such as those found in the Lightning Ridge deposits of Australia. Some of the best fossil cones come from the USA and are found in a strata called the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison formation. They can be 6-10cm across.
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Pyritized Brachiopod

Pyritized Brachiopod

Height:4cm     Width:6cm
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Pyritized Brachiopod

Brachiopods are a variety of shell fish, long known as 'lamp shells' because they resemble ancient oil lamps. They are commonly found as fossils, but some living varieties still exist. The Brachiopod is also the State Fossil of Kentucky, USA. Most Brachs have a fleshy stalk which attaches them to the bottom. Some Brachiopod shells are made of phosphatic material (eg. Lingula shell), but in most cases their shell is made of the mineral calcite. Rarely, it is an unusual form of calcium carbonate called Aragonite.
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Shrimp Lebanon

Shrimp Lebanon

Height:     Width:

Shrimp Lebanon


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Small Shark Tooth Morocco

Small Shark Tooth Morocco

Height:4cm     Width:3cm
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Small Shark Tooth

Shark fossils were ‘in’ on the start of Paleontology via the Danish physician and naturalist Nils Stensen, who was a 28 year old Protestant anatomist in Copenhagen when he was invited to Florence by Arch Duke Ferdinand II de Medici. A protector of Galileo, Ferdinand II now became a promoter of Stensen, who became the Arch Duke’s personal physician and tutor to his children. Under Medici’s patronage, Stensen converted to Catholicism and took the Latin name, Nicholas Steno.
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Squid Lebanon

Squid Lebanon

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Squid Lebanon


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Therapod Claw

Therapod Claw

Height:20cm     Width:5cm
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Therapod Claw

The name Therapoda was invented by the famous dinosaur hunter Othniel Marsh in 1881. Therapod means 'beast foot' and is used for a group of dinosaurs that seemed to have walked on 2 rear legs and had short front legs. Most had a 3-toed foot, as well as a wishbone and air-filled bones. They ranged from small dinosaurs like Coelophysis up to the much larger Gigantosaurus and Charcarodontasaurus which were the biggest Therapods. Despite their popularity, they were never the largest dinosaurs. The most famous Therapods are T-Rex, Veloceraptor and Deinonychus, so what can we learn from this huge claw about what they ate and how they lived and died.
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Trilobite Rolled

Trilobite Rolled

Height:8cm (3.2 inches)     Width:9cm (3.5 inches)
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PETRIFIED FRIGHT

These rolled up fossil creatures were named Trilobites in 1771 by Flood Geologist Johann Walch because they had 3 - body sections, (tri - lobes). Walch did not know what type of creature they were, but he thought they may have been mollusc shells since no legs had been found on them. Their identification was finally solved in 1879 when C. D. Walcott took 3500 rolled Trilobites, cut them open and discovered well preserved pairs of jointed flexible limbs inside. As a result Trilobites were placed in the Arthropod family (prawns, crabs etc). But what fascinating evidence of creation do they provide?
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